Tag Archives: payroll tax

Questions and Answers for the Additional Medicare Tax – Effective January 1, 2013

The following link will take you to questions and answers that will  provide employers and payroll service providers information that will help them as they prepare to implement the Additional Medicare Tax which goes into effect in 2013. The Additional Medicare Tax applies to individuals’ wages, other compensation, and self-employment income over certain thresholds; employers are responsible for withholding the tax on wages and other compensation in certain circumstances. The IRS has prepared these questions and answers to assist employers and payroll service providers in adapting systems and processes that may be impacted.

Click on the link below to be taken to the IRS Q&A:

Questions and Answers for the Additional Medicare Tax – From the IRS

For further tax planning considerations and questions, contact Schutte & Hilgendorf, pllc – CPAs.  We offer free initial consultations.  Schutte & Hilgendorf, pllc – CPA’s, is a full service public accounting firm providing tax planning, preparation, audit, accounting, and QuickBooks consulting to individuals, small businesses, non-profits, and homeowners associations in the Prescott and greater Yavapai County area.  Call us at 928-778-0079 or visit www.prescottaccountants.com


IRS/DOL Crackdown on Independent Contractor vs. Employee

IRS/DOL Crackdown

If you classify any workers as “independent contractors”—or have plans to do so—2013 is the year to make sure you get that classification correct.

Below is Topic 762 – Independent Contractor vs. Employee provided by irs.gov to help in identifying which classification a worker falls:

To determine whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee under common law, you must examine the relationship between the worker and the business. All evidence of control and independence in this relationship should be considered. The facts that provide this evidence fall into three categories – Behavioral Control, Financial Control, and the Type of Relationship.

Behavioral Control covers facts that show whether the business has a right to direct or control how the work is done, through instructions, training, or other means.

Financial Control covers facts that show whether the business has a right to direct or control the financial and business aspects of the worker’s job. This includes:

  • The extent to which the worker has unreimbursed business expenses
  • The extent of the worker’s investment in the facilities used in performing services
  • The extent to which the worker makes his or her services available to the relevant market
  • How the business pays the worker, and
  • The extent to which the worker can realize a profit or incur a loss

Type of Relationship covers facts that show how the parties perceive their relationship. This includes:

  • Written contracts describing the relationship the parties intended to create
  • The extent to which the worker is available to perform services for other, similar businesses
  • Whether the business provides the worker with employee-type benefits, such as insurance, a pension plan, vacation pay, or sick pay
  • The permanency of the relationship, and
  • The extent to which services performed by the worker are a key aspect of the regular business of the company

For more information, refer to Publication 15-A (PDF), Employer’s Supplemental Tax Guide, or Publication 1779 (PDF), Independent Contractor or Employee. If you want the IRS to determine whether a specific individual is an independent contractor or an employee, file Form SS-8 (PDF), Determination of Worker Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding.

Contact Schutte & Hilgendorf with your questions related to independent contractor vs. employee.  Schutte & Hilgendorf, CPAs, is a full service public accounting firm providing tax planning, preparation, audit, accounting, and QuickBooks consulting to individuals and small business in the Prescott and greater Yavapai County area.  Call us at 928-778-0079 or visit www.prescottaccountants.com


Knowing when to make your Arizona Withholding Payment

How does an employer know whether to make Arizona withholding payments on a quarterly basis or more frequently?

QUARTERLY BASIS PAYMENTS: An employer must make its Arizona withholding payments on a quarterly basis if the average amount of Arizona income taxes withheld during the preceding four calendar quarters does not exceed $1,500.

MORE FREQUENT PAYMENTS: An employer must make its Arizona withholding tax payments at the same time as its federal withholding deposits if the average amount of Arizona income taxes withheld during the preceding four calendar quarters exceeds $1,500.

WHY DOES THE EMPLOYER MAKE THIS COMPUTATION? Arizona law requires an employer, at the beginning of each new quarter, to compute its average Arizona withholding tax liability for the preceding four calendar quarters. This calculation is performed to determine the correct Arizona withholding payment schedule.

HOW DOES THE EMPLOYER MAKE THIS COMPUTATION? An employer that has four full consecutive calendar quarters of Arizona withholding liability historical data must use the regular withholding payment schedule computation. An employer that does not have four full consecutive calendar quarters of Arizona withholding liability historical data must use the alternate withholding payment schedule computation. Refer to the “Arizona Withholding Liability/Payment Schedule” section of the Form A1QRT instructions for further information

Per the State of Arizona – Department of Revenue – Arizona Withholding FAQ’s

Should you have questions regarding this post or any other tax needs, contact us at Schutte & Hilgendorf, PLLC, Prescott accountants serving the greater Yavapai County with tax, accounting, auditing, and QuickBooks consulting expertise.


Misclassifying Workers as Independent Contractors

Misclassifying Workers as Independent Contractors Can Be A Costly Mistake

Using independent contractors in your business can save money.  Independent contractors do not receive typical company benefits such as vacation, sick pay or health insurance/retirement benefits.  Plus, employers don’t pay social security taxes (FICA), or provide unemployment benefits. However, it is easy to blur the line between a true independent contractor and employee and the IRS is cracking down.

In order to be considered an independent contractor, a worker should meet certain criteria.  Control is one of the primary determinators.  What is your level of control over the worker?  An independent contractor determines how and when work will be performed whereas an employee’s work parameters are established by the employer.  For example, if you require a worker to attend regular meetings, work set hours and use specific materials and equipment, then in most cases that worker is an employee because you are exercising significant control over his/her job performance.

Other factors include such things as:

  • Working relationship. Does the worker have other clients with whom he works or does he work exclusively for you?  An independent contractor is in business for himself so he should have other clients or at least be in the market to acquire other business opportunities.
  • Work hours. An independent contractor should, in most cases be able to set his own work schedule.  As long as the contractor meets the deadline established by the client, he can decide his own work schedule.
  • Work location.  Generally, an independent contractor provides for his own work location, materials and equipment.  In other words, his primary office is not located at your company’s facility.
  • Expenses. Employees typically submit their work-related expenses to their employer for reimbursement.  An independent contractor, however, generally absorbs expenses as part of the cost of doing business.
  • Taxes. An independent contractor pays his own taxes by filing quarterly estimated tax returns.  Your company does not withhold taxes.

If the IRS determines you have misclassified a worker as an independent contractor rather than an employee, get out your checkbook.  You may be charged for back taxes, interest and penalties.  In fact, there is even the possibility of criminal charges.  And in some cases the misclassified worker has been able to sue the employer for lost benefits during the time in which he should have been considered an employee.

The IRS has a set of guidelines an employer can use to determine the proper status of a worker.  If you are still uncertain, give us a call us.

While in the short-term, using independent contractors in your business may save you money, it could cost you significantly more in the long-term.  Make sure you make the right choice.

(From business.gov article Misclassifying Workers as Independent Contractors Can Be Costly)

Should you have questions regarding this post or any other tax needs, contact us at Schutte & Hilgendorf, PLLC, Prescott accountants serving the greater Yavapai County with tax, accounting, auditing, and QuickBooks consulting expertise.